Monday, November 14, 2011

St. Benedict

(Moved from my now deleted "Restoration of Christian Culture Blog)

1500 years ago a young man fled the streets of Rome and went to live as a hermit. Dismayed with the state of "civilized" culture, this young man went out into the wilderness to pray and to work. He did not seek out disciples. He had no great plan to change the world. Yet, that single solitary soul burning with love for the one who first loved him set the world on fire. St. Benedict was to write a rule, and upon that rule monasteries throughout the world would be formed, and around these monasteries would spring up Christendom. The rule is simple enough to be followed by even the most intellectually deficient brother. Eight hours of prayer, eight hours of work, and eight hours of rest make man holy. One did not need to be a great scholar or orator to follow the maxim that would change the world: Ora et Labora. Today we are in desperate need of a new St. Benedict, or maybe we are in desperate need of a few good men willing to live by that same rule, a rule that endured through the ages. The hope is that, around the monasteries, a few courageous fathers can lead their families to begin again as our own "civilized" culture devours itself in self-indulgence of all sorts.

Today we again need a recommitment to our Catholic cultural heritage. Christendom has collapsed, but hope is not lost if only we are willing to seek first the Kingdom. We must look back at those ideals that formed Christendom and bring them to the forefront in our own times. The novelties of humanistic Enlightenment thinking must be put aside so that the glory of God can again be at the center of a renewal of Christendom. The Mass, from which springs Christendom, must be again the center of our lives. The great chants composed and sung by those great monasteries should be chanted in ever parish Church from the plains of Kansas to the cathedrals of Europe. Priests must learn to be priests, religious to be religious, men to be men, women to be women, and families to be families. We only discover this reality within the traditions of the Holy Catholic faith.

We must find a way of bringing forth Christendom again in our modern times. The challenges that face our modern world are different, but also remarkably the same as those of the past. Sin both public and private has become more and more accepted. This is ultimately what is wrong with the world. It is the original problem, and it must be fought. Yet, also we must look at the traditions of our faith and find ways to make Catholicism more than merely a Sunday visit to the Church. The Liturgy must again become the food of our spiritual lives. The Latin Mass must make a return to every parish everywhere. The Novus Ordo, if it is to remain, needs to be reformed in the light of Tradition, so as to feed the people on the fullness of the faith. Economic systems must be reformed to protect the family first, and to prevent the use and abuse of workers. Distributism as it is often called needs to be practiced wherever groups of orthodox Catholics are found in any reasonable number. Families must live lives centered around the Church, and anything that smacks of modernism or draws the family away from the Church must be discarded and disdained. All of these things and so much more must happen, but the foundation of the Social Reign of Jesus Christ is simple: Ora et Labora.

Pax Christi,
Kevin

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

+JMJ+

"The great chants composed and sung by those great monasteries should be chanted in ever parish Church from the plains of Kansas to the cathedrals of Europe. Priests must learn to be priests, religious to be religious, men to be men, women to be women, and families to be families. We only discover this reality within the traditions of the Holy Catholic faith."

Exceptional.

I think we'll eventually have to return to our roots. Which is the traditional Liturgy. The traditional liturgical life. So different in every way to the modern world, outside the nave.

A sort-of-related encyclical by Venerable Pius XII I thought you'd enjoy. You are on the right path.
http://www.papalencyclicals.net/Pius12/POPRURAL.HTM

iHs
James

Kevin Ford said...

James,

I agree with you. However, the NO isn't going to just disappear. I even had a cup of coffee with a couple members of the SSPX last week and they said the same thing. I think an increase of traditional practices into the NO for a period of time as well as the promotion of the TLM in every parish would be a good start. To do more radical liturgical changes, even if in the direction of tradition, would certainly cause even more confusion. Just look at how concerned people are with a few changes in the English translation. I agree that eventually we will return to our roots for now growth is truly organic if it does not have roots. Certain ideas and ideals of the old liturgical movement need to be put forward. A larger cycle of readings is certainly a good thing as long as it maintains the scriptural patrimony. Education of the people with regards to the meaning of the sacred rites is essential. I could go on , but you understand. We must pray for the renewal and restoration of Catholic Culture and the liturgy, which is the source of Cathoic culture.

Pax Christi,
Kevin

Anonymous said...

+JMJ+

It won't go away by mandate. I may fade away... organically... I do hear you what you are saying...

To see what the TLM has done for my family... my four children... a young son already feeling the call.. the vocational call... pre-adolesent... It's beautifully overwhelming...

Like life ont he land, hey?! :)

To me, they fit like hand and glove.

You and your family are in my prayers...